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Quitting smoking?

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Quitting smoking?

Post  Guest on Thu Jul 26, 2012 6:26 pm

Any advice on how to quit smoking? I just had last night what I hope is my last cigarette. I had a stressful job last year and used smoking as a way to deal with stress, then I ended up getting addicted. The longest I have gone without smoking for the past 6 months is two weeks. I've tried like 4 times to stop.

Feeling like in a fog today and having bouts of depression.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Fri Jul 27, 2012 12:11 am

It’s not easy, but stay with it.

If you fail, make the resolve to try harder, but don’t give in. Just make up your mind to do it (I mean really make up your mind) and don’t waver, no matter what. Take it minute by minute, hour by hour, and day by day. It does get easier – it really does, and the cravings will slowly recede. I smoked a pack-a-day for 34 years and quit cold turkey just over 5 years ago.

I did it for my family – and the fact that my father died at 58, a heavy smoker. My youngest never met her grandfather. I also did not like the control smoking had over my life, though I’m not one of those obnoxious ex-smokers since I don’t mind being around smoke and smokers, but I am no longer in any way “addicted” or have the urge, even if that familiar yearning will sometimes (but rarely) make a small "nudge" at me – I just blow it off, its gone in a few seconds, and hardly even registered as an "urge" - probably just a fond and fleeting memory.

You’re right about stress and the soothing effect of nicotine. That’s a tough one, but it can be managed. The other hard part is avoiding grabbing a smoke at those programmed times, such as with a cup of coffee, after a meal, and/or with a drink. Just look at it as a challenge and celebrate a small mental victory every time you resist the urge during one of those crawling-up-the-wall moments (which, at the beginning, can seem to last forever), because the urge does subside. During those tough moments, keep your mind and hands busy; say an Ave Maria, get up and take a brisk walk - whatever it takes. You’ll get through it and it will pay off by getting easier the longer you stay with it.

Last bit of advice, if you haven't already, get into some kind of exercise program. I work out at home, and its now a part of my life. It the second smartest thing I ever did for my health.

Hang in there, and “just do it”.

Good luck.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  Jehanne on Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:51 am

Rasha,

See a doctor. My wife drove me to the ER several weeks ago; thought that I was having a stroke, but fortunately, it was vertigo. The doc gave me some valium; great stuff. You may only need its equivalent for a few weeks, just to get you over “the hump.”

Blessings.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  George Brenner on Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:37 pm

Hi Rasha,

Volunteer to do charity work at a local hospital by visiting the sick. It will be be more rewarding then you can ever imagine. I do not know one volunteer that CURENTLY smokes

God Bless you,

JMJ,

George
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:14 pm

George, excellent ... that will do it!

I also like Jehanne's idea in a morbid kind of way ... more drugs! Laughing
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  columba on Thu Dec 27, 2012 9:33 am

Happened across this thread while doing a bita catching up after my temporary absence.

I'm a smoker too and often toyed with the idea of giving them up, not for personal health reasons but mainly because of the increasingly bad-press that smoking has gained over the past 20 or so years. I consider myself quite fit and healthy and usually walk about 6 or more miles per day at quite a brisk pace. I'm thinking; if I can gain an extra 4 or 5 years of life in a geriatric ward by ditching the weed, is that a good trade off?

I usually abstain from smoking during lent and end up with 6 weeks of flu-like symptoms which miraculously disappear on Easter Sunday after my first cig.

This got me thinking as to the reasons for so much aggression being levelled at smokers by the media, pharmaceutical companies and governments. I know for sure that none of the above 3 mentioned have any Mother Theresa-inspired-motives for wishing me good health and prosperity. For instance, the pharmaceuticals would never dream of having smoking banned just so as they could monopolize on the demise of the Tobacco Industry and produce their own brand of nicotine pills, patches and inhalers to fill the gap while creating a profitable side-line (as Jehanne has attested to) with increased sales of mind-bending drugs for all those poor, dejected ex-smokers who now find themselves incapable of functioning in their new nicotine deprived world (not a big price to pay for transforming oneself from a detestable smoker to a loved-by-everybody pill junky). Nah.. that would be far from the minds of Johnton & Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline and their ilk.

Anyway. I had one of those -now notorious- gut feelings, that maybe smoking ain't just as bad as they're making it out to be. What if there's even health benefits from tobacco which they don't want you to know about. Maybe benefits such as immunizing or partially nullifying the harmful effects of other chemicals now being used to gradually poison or sterilize the masses. Not so far fetched when you consider the goals of the population control fanatics.

I searched in vain to find evidence in support of my conspiracy theory Smile but then I just happened across the following little sermon by Fr. Ripperger FSSP.

http://www.sensustraditionis.org/webaudio/Sermons/Disk5/Smoking.mp3

It may not go as far as agreeing with my outlandish theories but it doesn't make me abandon them.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Thu Dec 27, 2012 1:04 pm

Columba, you are right about the social stigma; smokers are ostracized, mocked and hated; often pitied.

Anti-smoking Nazi’s are a despicable species. I read where during a recent “concert” Madonna yelled at some young “fans” who were enjoying a smoke - that if they truly “loved” her, they wouldn’t smoke. How funny and narcissistic is that? It called a god complex.

Fr. Ripperger sounds like someone who has never smoked.

It’s almost comical when he says smoking is fine, but smoking addiction should be overcome - it’s a sin against temperance. He’s kidding, right? How does one measure “excess”?

How many people do you know are true “social smokers” who light up only in the company of others when, for example, having an after-dinner cocktail; or, who smoke just a couple of cigarettes per day?

Most smokers go through a long phase of denial, and tell themselves and anyone who will listen that they are not addicted, and can quit at any time. Right.

Smoking harm’s the body, period; so every doctor would tell the good priest that, by Fr’s own standards, smoking is a sin (with the noted exception for mitigating the affects of certain diseases or conditions). The positive affects of smoking, however, such as mitigating the onset of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, are negligible when weighed against the inherent debilitating affects upon the body.

Of course, one does not know how the body is being harmed until the onset of some smoking-related disease or condition.

A lady in the UK recently celebrated her 104th birthday, and to the obligatory longevity question, she replied she made the smart decision to quit smoking way back when she was ….. 100. Of course, she also has her daily drink (or two) of whiskey, which might be the real reason for her being so sweetly pickled.

The most likely reason, however, is simple, good genes that can resist the long-term affects of smoking. Some have them, most do not.

For the average bloke, the smoking habit is Russian Roulette. Odds are in the house’s favor (e.g., cancer, emphysema, early death); it’s just a matter of time. You might be one of the exceptions, but don’t count on it. Those long walks will do nothing to erase the cumulative affects on your respiratory system and on every organ in your body, which, odds are, will take its toll in one form or another. If the risks are tolerable, go for it; just don’t have any regrets should some smoking-related disease take an early toll.

On a visit to a large VA hospital many years ago, I remember having a smoke outside when one of the patients in his VA robe approached me to bum a cigarette. Having his smoke, I asked him about his illness, and he said he had emphysema. He was dying, so why not have one of life’s little pleasures that satisfy, for the moment, one’s addiction?

My daughter and son-in-law are trying to quit, and are on those electronic cigarettes. I took a “puff” on Christmas day to see what it was like, and was surprised at the little jolt of nicotine (somewhere in the recesses of my brain could be heard, “hello, my old friend, where have you been?”) The “smoke” is a light waft of water vapor, and it’s definitely cheaper than cigarettes, which are outrageous (that was another reason why I quit – couldn’t afford the luxury when I left the job market). Btw, there is no urge to take up the electronic version, but I know that had it been a real cigarette, that old craving (after the sharp cough - the protest of my lungs), would have made its presence felt.

Check it out; I’m not sure what real smokers are saying about it, and only time will tell if it works for my daughter and her husband, but, whatever works.

Rasha, any success?
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  columba on Thu Dec 27, 2012 5:08 pm

Fr. Ripperger sounds like someone who has never smoked.

It’s almost comical when he says smoking is fine, but smoking addiction should be overcome - it’s a sin against temperance. He’s kidding, right? How does one measure “excess”?

Mike, I think Fr Ripperger explained that excess is relative to the individual's capacity (or lack there of) to cope with certain doses. For example, I can comfortably sink 3 pints of Guiness but give me a fourth and I'm a borderline drunk, but I have some colleagues who could drink twice that amount and remain compos mentis.

How many people do you know are true “social smokers” who light up only in the company of others when, for example, having an after-dinner cocktail; or, who smoke just a couple of cigarettes per day?

I have a son-in-law who doesn't smoke at all during the week but at the weekend he'll buy a pack of 10 and enjoy a half dozen smokes through Saturday and Sunday.
I'll admit though that he's the exception rather than the rule.

Most smokers go through a long phase of denial, and tell themselves and anyone who will listen that they are not addicted, and can quit at any time. Right.

Right. And I'm one of those who believes he can quit at any time but please don't put me to the test. Smile

Smoking harm’s the body, period; so every doctor would tell the good priest that, by Fr’s own standards, smoking is a sin (with the noted exception for mitigating the affects of certain diseases or conditions). The positive affects of smoking, however, such as mitigating the onset of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, are negligible when weighed against the inherent debilitating affects upon the body.

I think most doctors consider smoking a mortal sin and hold that view while prescribing contraceptives and making abortion referrals so they lose out badly in the moral credibility scale.

At the end of the day, most non-smokers fare no better than the smoker; the mortality rate for both being 100%. I don't know of course what the eternal salvation rate is for either.
On that subject: Who would I put my money on, the non-smoking Jew, Muslim, Pagan or Protestant or the smoking practicing Catholic? If the tobacco smoke don't get the former it's a revealed truth that the smoke from another source will.

Of course, one does not know how the body is being harmed until the onset of some smoking-related disease or condition.

The problem here is that many end up with "smoking-related diseases" who never smoked a cigarette in their lives but if they had been smokers the cigs would have been labeled the culprit.

A guy went to the doctor suffering from a bad cough. The doctor asked, "Do you smoke?" The man replied, " No doctor, never smoked a day in my life." The doctor replied, "That's a pitty because going off them would have helped you." Very Happy

A lady in the UK recently celebrated her 104th birthday, and to the obligatory longevity question, she replied she made the smart decision to quit smoking way back when she was ….. 100.

Poor lady. If she'd only listened to her cravings she may have made it to 110. jocolor

Those long walks will do nothing to erase the cumulative affects on your respiratory system and on every organ in your body, which, odds are, will take its toll in one form or another. If the risks are tolerable, go for it; just don’t have any regrets should some smoking-related disease take an early toll.

I was browsing through a Readers Digest the other day. Apparently they've found conclusive evidence that Big Foot is real. Shocking too about that Titanic.

On a visit to a large VA hospital many years ago, I remember having a smoke outside when one of the patients in his VA robe approached me to bum a cigarette. Having his smoke, I asked him about his illness, and he said he had emphysema. He was dying, so why not have one of life’s little pleasures that satisfy, for the moment, one’s addiction?

Poor guy. Imagine what it must be like having an addiction for begging.

My daughter and son-in-law are trying to quit, and are on those electronic cigarettes. I took a “puff” on Christmas day to see what it was like, and was surprised at the little jolt of nicotine (somewhere in the recesses of my brain could be heard, “hello, my old friend, where have you been?”) The “smoke” is a light waft of water vapor, and it’s definitely cheaper than cigarettes, which are outrageous (that was another reason why I quit – couldn’t afford the luxury when I left the job market). Btw, there is no urge to take up the electronic version, but I know that had it been a real cigarette, that old craving (after the sharp cough - the protest of my lungs), would have made its presence felt.

Check it out; I’m not sure what real smokers are saying about it, and only time will tell if it works for my daughter and her husband, but, whatever works.

Mike, I was conned into buying one of those at a supermarket mall last year. They had a rigged test sampler that worked perfect in the mall but when I got mine home it darn nearly collasped my jaws trying to get a nicotine fix from it.
I believe they have better models on the market now and I've read some good reviews on Amazon. I might give it a second chance. Like you say, the cost of cigarettes is now criminal. There's new EC regulations in the pipeline for banning the public display of cigarettes in shops. Some of the bigger stores have taken the initiative and covered their cigarette shelves with curtains. Apparently all cigarettes are soon to be sold in plain, one color packets with no frills regardless of brand. Seems the nanny state is going all out to preserve my life and I didn't even send them a Christmas card.

Seriously though, I do hope you've managed to kick the habit Rasha.

I for one (out of charity) will continue in my addiction. Nothing worse than a nicotine-deprived Irishman running amok on a non-confrontational forum such as this.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Thu Dec 27, 2012 5:39 pm

columba wrote:
Fr. Ripperger sounds like someone who has never smoked.

It’s almost comical when he says smoking is fine, but smoking addiction should be overcome - it’s a sin against temperance. He’s kidding, right? How does one measure “excess”?
Mike, I think Fr Ripperger explained that excess is relative to the individual's capacity (or lack there of) to cope with certain doses. For example, I can comfortably sink 3 pints of Guiness but give me a fourth and I'm a borderline drunk, but I have some colleagues who could drink twice that amount and remain compos mentis.
Yes, understood, that works for alcohol, but not, generally, for smoking.

Btw, I'm sure simple-faith said your limit is two pints - but, why quibble?

columba wrote:I for one (out of charity) will continue in my addiction. Nothing worse than a nicotine-deprived Irishman running amok on a non-confrontational forum such as this.
I agree!

And thanks for the good-humored sarcasm, I enjoyed it, quite apropos.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  George Brenner on Thu Dec 27, 2012 8:50 pm

From my experience from personal relatives along with patients that I see almost every week in the hospital dying from lung cancer. Most of the patients are in their 60's and 70's. Ironic but most that make it to 80 or older seem to have a much lower incidence of lung cancer but then again nothing scientific from this observation. ALL end days have extremely similar symptoms and similarities. Deterioration as follows:

1. oxygen assistance
2. much cooler room temperature
3. full oxygen mask over nose and mouth, room fans in addition to cooler room
4. heart beat continues to become more and more rapid
5. Fighting for every breath; extremely painful for patient
6. Heart gives out.
7. Heaven, Purgatory or hell

Quit smoking !
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  columba on Fri Dec 28, 2012 7:37 am

George Brenner wrote: From my experience from personal relatives along with patients that I see almost every week in the hospital dying from lung cancer. Most of the patients are in their 60's and 70's. Ironic but most that make it to 80 or older seem to have a much lower incidence of lung cancer but then again nothing scientific from this observation. ALL end days have extremely similar symptoms and similarities. Deterioration as follows:

1. oxygen assistance
2. much cooler room temperature
3. full oxygen mask over nose and mouth, room fans in addition to cooler room
4. heart beat continues to become more and more rapid
5. Fighting for every breath; extremely painful for patient
6. Heart gives out.
7. Heaven, Purgatory or hell

Quit smoking !

Cancer rates seem to be exceptionally high in Ireland. There's speculation as to why this is with the key suspects being Britain's nuclear power plants four of which are situated on the west coast which allows for leaked radiation drifting in the wind across the Irish sea.

A few of my extended family members have died of cancer.: An aunt who never smoked died aged 42 from lung cancer; another aunt who did smoke died a few years off 80 from lung cancer. My grandmother who smoked most of her adult life died of natural causes aged 96. Her brother who smoked died at 94 (natural causes) and her sister who never smoked died (natural causes) at 100 yrs old. Its hard to determine from those statistics what part smoking may have played in the family mortality graph.

A good friend of mine (who would be in his early 50's now) used to harp on at me about smoking. He himself never put a cig in his mouth but died 15 yrs ago from lung cancer as did another good friend who died of liver cancer. Another old school friend (non-smoker) died from a brain tumor in his early 40's.

I could go on listing many more people I know who never smoked but died young from what would have been considered smoking-related illnesses if in fact they had been smokers.
(Not to tempt fate but most of my surviving friends from that era are all smokers).

I'm not here promoting the idea that smoking is a healthy occupation but from my own local observations I can't get myself too hyped up about campaigning against it on health grounds. Most militant non-smokers (again from my local experience) don't detest smoking on health grounds or from concern for the well-being of the smoker but rather from not liking their homes being contaminated with the lingering scent of stale tobacco smoke (which of course I respect) but please don't use the argument that you're concerned for my health.

Another common non-health-related reason for despising smoking is what they see as the extravagant waste of money (that presumably could have been saved and given to the poor) but the very same non-smokers don't seem to give any more alms than the smoker. What are they doing with all that extra saved money one might ask? I'd hazard a guess that it goes towards more cleaning products to feed their OCD that in turn makes the family feel more at home in the back yard than inside the house.

The drain on the Health Service too is commonly used as a “reason” for picking on the smoker, what with all them smokers clogging up the hospital beds. But unfortunately that one don't wash either. For every pack of cigs purchased by the smoker, the equivalent (here in Ireland and the UK) of $10 goes in taxes. That means the average smoker contributes approx $70 per week to his healthcare plan which he may never use by disrespectfully dying of natural causes.

Balance that against the huge army of disaffected ex-smokers who finding themselves mentally disorientated turn up in droves at the hospices offering their assistance free of charge to help console the dying smoker who, if asked, would only wish to be left alone to smoke his last few fags in peace without judgment.

Everyone's a winner: The hospice gets free labor, the ex-smoker (cum counsellor) gets his cravings held a bay, the government gets its taxes, the pharmaceuticals get selling their patches and pills, the tobacco industry gets to grow potatoes and the dying smoker gets his own personal bedside army of ex-smokers helping him repent.

Smokers! Please keep smoking! The system depends on you!




George, I'm being very tongue-in-cheek. geek

I need a cigarette!

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  George Brenner on Fri Dec 28, 2012 2:33 pm

Columba,

I know..... I know, but I think that you mean ' smoke in cheek'


George


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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:17 am

The problem with smoking (nicotine-addiction) though is that it is the biggest mind-blowing drug known to man believe it or not. 20 years ago it was perfectly fine to blow smoke in your new-born baby's face, (nicotine-addicted) doctors actually offered a cigarette to a mother who had just delivered a baby. Smokers (nicotine-addicts) thought processes are WARPED. They are experts at defending their addiction relying on society to justify their dependence. They quote grandmothers, grandfathers and any old person's longevity to justify why they don't need to stop. They are oblivious to what the addiction and brainwashing does to them psychologically... I am not even talking about the health risks at all, I am talking about how addiction warps the thought-processes and nicotine addiction is the biggest mind-warper ever, even more so than alcohol or any other drug if they dare to break out of their little sad box and ever face realism they will see that.. because nicotine addicts need a fix every hour or less and a smoker needs to be a master of deception, lies and justification to continue doing it. A smoker is brainwashed by their own addiction and they don't realise it, everytime they quit for a period they tell lies as to why they started again, such as 'ooh i was so stressed, i got headaches, i got a permanent cold' LIES, drug-addicts lying justifications. Addicts to anything are constantly on the defensive and they have to a avoid certain situations, they need to justify every cigarette and why they won't / can not quit. Their self-esteem stays low and they feel an outcast around people and family that despise it. The ONLY reason that current smokers don't quit is because they are afraid. Columba justifies keeping smoking by saying he had permanent cold symptoms for 6 weeks. What a load of sad sad lies! and a good justification not to quit permanently because he might sneeze and cough, but he ignores the facts that he is subconciously exagerating the issue so he can keep his addiction going and justify his 20 a day habit, or however many he smokes, out of the sheer mind- control of addiction. He happily ignores the fact he is coughing permanently while he smokes, he is deliberately lying to himself and trying to convince others. If anyone smokes nowadays it is because they are AFRAID to stop and live in the brainwashed illusion of drug addiction and lies that they will justify with absolute krap until they die. Most heroine addicts give up their addiction eventually because they get the sense to face up to the destruction it has caused in their lives. If only smokers could get that wake-up call too to see that their absolute wind-warp is no different at all to other addicts plight. Nicotine addiction is the biggest lying scurge ever put on society, discovered and promoted by the evil Red Indian Satanic controlled Mayans during the 2nd-3rd century. The sad thing is these addicts never face up and challenge ever why they actually DO it because they are too busy justifying why they do it, and invent lies and avoid any situation where they are not allowed to do it. Like I said, it is a MIND-WARPING drug, more so than alcohol and heroine. I know because I used to be one, when that addiction left everything else in my life became happy and real instead of the constant stress of having to satisfy an all-consuming urge I didn't need in the first place.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  columba on Sun Dec 30, 2012 10:25 am

My word RG! You need a cigarette! Shocked

Can't wait for a chance to respond to this. Stay tuned.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:12 pm

MRyan wrote:Columba, you are right about the social stigma; smokers are ostracized, mocked and hated; often pitied.

Anti-smoking Nazi’s are a despicable species.
Wow! No sooner said then ......

Have fun, columba!
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:21 pm

MRyan wrote:
MRyan wrote:Columba, you are right about the social stigma; smokers are ostracized, mocked and hated; often pitied.

Anti-smoking Nazi’s are a despicable species.
Wow! No sooner said then ......

Have fun, columba!

LOL Sometimes it takes a massive jolt to make a massive change!

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:28 pm

Having once been involved in the music industry for most of my life I fell victim of all the sinister drug traps and excesses associated with it that I am too embarrassed now to even dwell on. After getting 'clean' I clung on to chain-smoking for another 5 years inspite of ultimatums and all the usual warnings. On getting free of them I realised what a haze of confusion I'd been in regarding the whole smoking trap, it took a random encounter with a music friend to make me realise it can be easily done with the correct mind-set and the correct facts (and I do not mean medical facts). Smoking is the biggest gate-way drug to other excesses and smokers lives revolve around access to their 'fix' and has to be justified in their mind, it's only when you see it for what it truly is can you break out of the obsessive behavior, and look back and say wow thank God I don't have to do that anymore. And far from being an anti-smoking Nazi, I never bring the subject up unless a smoker brings it up and is still peddling the everyday justifications not to quit doing it (as in this topic).

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:51 pm

Your failures and addictions are not necessarily Columba's failure and addiction.

And that wasn’t a “jolt”, that was an in your face no-holds barred personal tirade that was anything but “Catholic”.

What I mean by that is that the proper Catholic response has always been to respect both the obligations we have towards our God-created bodies and the freedom to imbibe in social and personal pleasures, but never to the sin of excess. What is excess to you may not be to others. Smokers accept the fact that there is a certain risk in their behavior, but there is a certain risk in many things we eat and do, such as driving the car when it is not absolutely necessary. Death lurks around every corner and with every on-coming vehicle, at least in my state, where driving while on the phone and/or twittering is routine.

Gary Potter is an unapologetic chain-smoking Catholic who I wouldn’t dare lecture on the dangers of smoking, of which he is most certainly aware. I would have a drink with him anytime, and wouldn’t complain about the smoke (if allowed). I would even follow him outside to continue the conversation as he takes a smoke break – his company is that enjoyable. He would scoff at the smoking Nazi’s and their feigned concern for the health of others. Let him (and other Catholics) be, it’s his life, and he is enjoying it to the fullest.

I have seen the deaths of a couple of hard-smoking Catholics, and not one of them left this world whining about “if I had only quit sooner”, one of whom I am certain met His Maker in a state of grace.

Catholics have a unique perspective on such things as smoking, and the pleasures of this life in general, but you seem to be a died-in-the-wool-anti-smoking Nazi, though you claim not to be.

Columba, as you will soon learn, is too smart to fall for your "jolting" tactics.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 6:00 pm

MRyan wrote:Your failures and addictions are not necessarily Columba's failure and addiction.

And that wasn’t a “jolt”, that was an in your face no-holds barred personal tirade that was anything but “Catholic”.

What I mean by that is that the proper Catholic response has always been to respect both the obligations we have towards our God-created bodies and the freedom to imbibe in social and personal pleasures, but never to the sin of excess. What is excess to you may not be to others. Smokers accept the fact that there is a certain risk in their behavior, but there is a certain risk in many things we eat and do, such as driving the car when it is not absolutely necessary. Death lurks around every corner and with every on-coming vehicle, at least in my state, where driving while on the phone and/or twittering is routine.

Gary Potter is an unapologetic chain-smoking Catholic who I wouldn’t dare lecture on the dangers of smoking, of which he is most certainly aware. I would have a drink with him anytime, and wouldn’t complain about the smoke (if allowed). I would even follow him outside to continue the conversation as he takes a smoke break – his company is that enjoyable. He would scoff at the smoking Nazi’s and their feigned concern for the health of others. Let him (and other Catholics) be, it’s his life, and he is enjoying it to the fullest.

I have seen the deaths of a couple of hard-smoking Catholics, and not one of them left this world whining about “if I had only quit sooner”, one of whom I am certain met His Maker in a state of grace.

Catholics have a unique perspective on such things as smoking, and the pleasures of this life in general, but you seem to be a died-in-the-wool-anti-smoking Nazi, though you claim not to be.

Columba, as you will soon learn, is too smart to fall for your "jolting" tactics.

What a load of twaddle Mike. Go train your kids to smoke then. You hypocrite!

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Sun Dec 30, 2012 6:31 pm

RememberGethsemane wrote:
What a load of twaddle Mike. Go train your kids to smoke then. You hypocrite!
I would be very disappointed if any of my children were to take up smoking, though one of them has. She knows it is not in her best interest, and will quit when she can muster the will. She is currently trying.

Neither of my sons have ever smoked, and they grew up around me smoking. But, if one of them took up the habit, I would let them know I was disappointed, and leave it at that, its his life.

Btw, I believe statistics reveal that in general women are much more susceptible to the risks associated with smoking than men.

Anyway, your statement that I should "train" my children to smoke is pathetic.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  MRyan on Sun Dec 30, 2012 6:37 pm

RememberGethsemane wrote:Having once been involved in the music industry for most of my life I fell victim of all the sinister drug traps and excesses associated with it that I am too embarrassed now to even dwell on.
Some of the worse anti-smoking Nazi's are ex-smokers, and your "excesses" with drugs explains a lot. You have thus convinced yourself that:

Smoking is the biggest gate-way drug to other excesses and smokers lives revolve around access to their 'fix' and has to be justified in their mind
What a load of silly twaddle.
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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 6:42 pm

Well if you want to make out it's a pleasurable thing to do and promote it then why not train your kids to do it? Statistics show that youngsters that experiment with 4 or more cigarettes end up regular smokers. It is an addiction, it doesn't go away and gets progressively worse unless you take advice and action which I was giving having been through it myself. No smoker get's any pleasure from smoking unless they are addicted to it otherwise there is no enjoyment in it. If I give a non-smoker a cigarette they will cough and feel sick unless they persevere and build up immunity at the expense of their well-being. When I realised these facts it helped me get free instead of the belief I had that it was something flawed in me why I couldn't stop.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Sun Dec 30, 2012 6:47 pm

In my case I started smoking at 14 then pot at 16 which lead to harder drugs. Do you know that about 80% of 'alcoholics' are also smokers. Like I say, it's a gate-way drug.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  columba on Sun Dec 30, 2012 10:39 pm

Looking forward to this RG. pirat

RememberGethsemane wrote:
The problem with smoking (nicotine-addiction) though is that it is the biggest mind-blowing drug known to man believe it or not.

OK... Where does one start?
If I can show that you're wrong in your opening statement will that suffice as a refutation for the rest of your post?

I used to watch Ripley's Believe it or Not (years ago) but I've never seen that episode.
Nor have I ever seen a tobacco smoker stand in the middle of a busy road doing a chicken dance while horns blow and traffic swerves to avoid him. Nor have I ever heard a news report of a smoker jumping off a 5th story balcony thinking he's a bird.
Nor have I ever witnessed a smoker being tied to a bed in a drug rehab institution while pink elephants bring him his medication. It may have happened but I've never heard of it.
Do you see where I'm going with this RG.

20 years ago it was perfectly fine to blow smoke in your new-born baby's face, (nicotine-addicted) doctors actually offered a cigarette to a mother who had just delivered a baby.

RG, where do you get this information? I know many smokers with children but never known any of them to blow smoke in their new-born babies face. In fact even 20 yrs ago one would leave the baby ward if he/she wanted a smoke.

Now if I were a woman who had just given birth, the first thing I would look for is a cigarette and woe to the doctor who would refuse me.

Smokers (nicotine-addicts) thought processes are WARPED.

Is this from your own personal experience of the weed, cause if so -with statements like that- going off them didn't help.

From what I've read of the saint, Padre Pio used to smoke the occassional cigarette. (the devils advocate must have missed that one) and many have experienced the sweet scent of tobacco when praying to him for favors.

They are experts at defending their addiction relying on society to justify their dependence. They quote grandmothers, grandfathers and any old person's longevity to justify why they don't need to stop

And who would "they" be?
I don't need society to justify my preferences while (thus far) we're still a relatively free country. If I were to quote grandmothers, grandfathers and any old person's longevity, it wouldn't be to justify why I don't need to stop; it would be for the simple reason that it was true. What makes you think that a smoker has to justify why he smokes? If he quotes the longevity of relatives who smoked it's merely to counter the lie that all smokers die young.

They are oblivious to what the addiction and brainwashing does to them psychologically... I am not even talking about the health risks at all, I am talking about how addiction warps the thought-processes and nicotine addiction is the biggest mind-warper ever, even more so than alcohol or any other drug if they dare to break out of their little sad box and ever face realism they will see that


I'm having a smoke while writing this and to be honest I think I'm refuting your arguments quite clearly. At the same time I can see by your own thought process that you're attributing to tobacco what should be attributed to some other intoxicant and its residual effects.

because nicotine addicts need a fix every hour or less and a smoker needs to be a master of deception, lies and justification to continue doing it

I don't need to lie in order to smoke. I just smoke. I don't even deceive myself as I know there's a possibility that I could be one of the unlucky ones who die. Where's the lie there?

A smoker is brainwashed by their own addiction and they don't realise it, everytime they quit for a period they tell lies as to why they started again, such as 'ooh i was so stressed, i got headaches, i got a permanent cold' LIES, drug-addicts lying justifications.

I go off them for Lent. I don't lie to myself in order to go back on them. I just remember it's Easter Sunday and Lent's over and thank the Lord for the gift of tobacco.

Unfortunately I really am one of those who get a semi-permanent cold whenever I quit. It's to be expected. The body does some readjusting that can take many forms.
But it is Lent so I just accept it as part of the deal.

Addicts [addicted] to anything are constantly on the defensive and they have to a avoid certain situations, they need to justify every cigarette and why they won't / can not quit.

Addicts who take illegal drugs probably do avoid certain situations such as police check-points and airports, or keeping out of reach of their parents when stoned but you keep saying that the smoker has to justify smoking. I smoke but this is the first time in years I've had to justify it and that's mainly to counter some false information of which you've given ample supply.

Their self-esteem stays low and they feel an outcast around people and family that despise it.

I've noticed no dramatic infusion of self-esteem whenever I quit but maybe that's just me. As for those who despise smoking I leave them to sort out their own problem. As Fr Rippergher would say, "Those who believe smoking is intrinsically evil are in error and to persist in error is dangerous"

I'll have to leave it there RG for now but will return to this fascinating topic.
This is quite therapeutic for me.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Mon Dec 31, 2012 8:04 am

You're missing my point here Columba, and you personally are not being attacked by me. I am attacking the 'machine' and the mind-set that smokers in general have that allows them to contihue doing it. And the whole thing about Padre Pio there made me laugh out loud, it isn't tobacco these people are smelling, my understanding is that it is a distinct perfume but maybe they are smokers and their senses of smell are contaminated. Anyways the point regarding the mind-warp of the smoker is the hardest to get across here, you are giving examples of people dancing in the street like chickens etc. under the influence of alcohol or other mind-altering drugs. The mind-warp of the nicotine addict is much more subtle as they are in a constant subconscious battle most of them wishing they could break free from the control of it, others defending it. But I'm leaving it there with this topic because my arguments are only helpful for smokers who have had enough and want to quit as opposed to those who wish to go on deluding themselves and keep defending it in their mind.

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Re: Quitting smoking?

Post  RememberGethsemane on Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:05 am

On the feast day of the circumsion of Christ, Columba, Can you picture St. Joseph taking Our Blessed Mother out for a smoke afterwards? On the Birth of the Christ can you picture His Blessed Mother having a long-awaited drag on a fag afterwards, after giving them up for 9 months, if she done that you would believe even more that there is something tremondously special in nicotine and even the bible tells us so. But please picture that situation when you are defending your desire to keep smoking nicotine until you die. Happy new year!

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